Sunday, November 19, 2017
NZTA checking 300,000 cars being recalled in New Zealand for potential...

NZTA checking 300,000 cars being recalled in New Zealand for potential malfunctioning airbags,

 New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) says  that It could take up to 2019 to finish checking about 300,000 cars being recalled in New Zealand for potential malfunctioning airbags. People can check     their  own car/s  recalled or not by verifying  the website www.recalls.co.nz 

The airbags are manufactured by Japanese firm Takata, and the part is being recalled after incidents around the world in which airbags either did not inflate or fired out pieces of metal when inflated in accidents. In some cases people were badly hurt, or died.

air-bag2The global recall has been going on for the past two years but there has been renewed media coverage and, in this country, the website recalls.govt.nz crashed today as people tried to find out if their car was among those affected. 

The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, which runs the site, said a team was working to restore the site as soon as possible.

Motor Industry Association’s chief executive David Crawford said the recall had expanded and was now the biggest worldwide in motoring history.

The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, which runs the site, said a team was working to restore the site as soon as possible.

Motor Industry Association’s chief executive David Crawford said the recall had expanded and was now the biggest worldwide in motoring history.

The modifications carried out on vehicles in Japan involved disconnecting the airbag and placing an extra component into the vehicle’s electronics, resulting in the car’s self-diagnostic systems registering the disabled airbag as functional.

Due to the way these modifications were done in Japan, invasive visual checks are the only way of determining with certainty if the airbags have been disabled, as the vehicle’s dashboard warning lights will not identify the disabled airbags.

Since becoming aware of the issue the Transport Agency has urgently amended the entry certification inspection requirements for used imported vehicles from Japan. From tomorrow these vehicles will be required to undergo a visual check of the airbag connection, which in most cases will involve physically dismantling part of the vehicle to sight the airbag connection.

This morning owners of cars potentially affected by the fault airbags were being told to contact their local dealer or manufacturer to see if their car was affected.

The list that appears on the government recall website includes BMW, Chrysler, Daihatsu, GM, Ferrari, Ford, Honda Isuzu, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru, Toyota,etc..

 

The NZ Transport Agency is urging the owners of vehicles affected by the global Takata airbag recall to have checks carried out to check their front passenger airbags aren’t disabled.

The agency recently discovered that in 2015 some manufacturers in Japan began offering customers the option of disabling front passenger airbags, in response to public concerns in Japan about wait times for replacement airbags as part of the global recall.

Up to 300,000 vehicles in New Zealand have been recalled because of malfunctioning airbags that either do not inflate or fire out pieces of metal when inflated in an accident – injuring people and even causing death.

The modifications carried out on vehicles in Japan involved disconnecting the airbag and placing an extra component into the vehicle’s electronics, resulting in the car’s self-diagnostic systems registering the disabled airbag as functional.

Due to the way these modifications were done in Japan, invasive visual checks are the only way of determining with certainty if the airbags have been disabled, as the vehicle’s dashboard warning lights will not identify the disabled airbags.

Since becoming aware of the issue the Transport Agency has urgently amended the entry certification inspection requirements for used imported vehicles from Japan. From tomorrow these vehicles will be required to undergo a visual check of the airbag connection, which in most cases will involve physically dismantling part of the vehicle to sight the airbag connection.

This morning owners of cars potentially affected by the fault airbags were being told to contact their local dealer or manufacturer to see if their car was affected.

The list that appears on the government recall website includes BMW, Chrysler, Daihatsu, GM, Ferrari, Ford, Honda Isuzu, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru, Toyota, and Mercedes-Benz

To date there have been no injuries reported in New Zealand as a result of faulty airbags exploding.

Car manufacturers this morning told the Herald they were directly contacting affected car owners but it would take months to fix the problem because there was a shortage of replacement airbags.

“This is the largest recall in history and we simply don’t have enough parts,” said Mitsubishi head of sales and marketing Daniel Cook.

He said 12,171 Mitsubishi vehicles had been identified in the global recall. They included Lancer (2003-2008), Triton (2006-2014), i-Car (2008-2010) and Pajeros and Delica D5.

About 8000 vehicles with faulty airbags were expected to be replaced this year with the remainder completed by June next year.

Toyota NZ said 82,000 vehicles were caught up in the global recall. Based on the limited supply it was estimated to take up to two years to replace all airbags in affected vehicles.

At this stage 12,879 car owners had been advised that replacement airbags were available.

Toyota would be providing an update to remaining affected customers over the next three weeks.

Their main models affected are new and imported Yaris, Corolla and RAV4, and the imported Ipsum.

There are other models, 21 including the four mentioned, affected in smaller numbers.

Drivers can head to toyota.co.nz/recall to fill out a form and see if their car is subject to the recall.

BMW’s New Zealand spokesman Paul Sherley said about 3500 New Zealand new vehicles were affected and 9300 used-imported vehicles.

“All owners of New Zealand-new vehicles have been contacted, and the process to contact the owners of used-imports is also under way,” he said.

“Over two thirds of the New Zealand-new cars have had the recall work completed to date.”

All owners of New Zealand-new cars have been contacted and BMW are working on contacting the owners of used-imported vehicles.

“The decision of exactly when to have the recall work carried out is really up to the customer,” Sherley said.

No new Fords sold in New Zealand are involved in the recall, but owners of imported Fords can head to the safety recalls section of the Ford website to see if their vehicle is being recalled.

Ferrari spokeswoman Catherine Rodwell said the models affected include all Ferrari vehicles manufactured starting from 2008 with regard to Europe, and from 2009 with regard to the US and all other countries, except for the Ferrari 612 Scaglietti, Ferrari 599, Ferrari F430 – all versions- and LaFerrari model vehicles.

Mazda New Zealand service campaign manager for service and warranty Jacob Moolman said the affected cars sold in New Zealand were the M6 from 2002-07, the RX8 from 2003-2012, the Mazda 2 Demio from 2007-2014, Mazda T series from 2004-2010, the B series from 2004-2011, and the E series from 2004-2016.

Honda NZ national service manager Bryan Davis said their affected models were Accord, Civic, CRV, Jazz, Legend, Odyssey, Insight, and MDX.

The years were varied. Davis encouraged anyone with an affected model to head to the Honda website, click on service, and enter their vehicle’s details in the recalls section to find out if their car needed a replacement airbag.

Website crashes

Motor Industry Association head David Crawford told the Herald last night that there had been a number of accidents overseas in which people had been injured or killed because of the faulty airbags, manufactured by Japanese company Takata.

The Government publishes recall information on its recalls.govt.nz website, which is run by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment and the NZ Transport Agency, among others.

The website had been down since last night but was now running again, with a warning that heavy online traffic might have impacts.

A spokeswoman initially said the website was subject to scheduled maintenance.

However, she later confirmed the unexpected volume of car owners seeking information overwhelmed the system.

( courtesy NZ radio& NZ herald) 

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